Headphones, Reviews, Uncategorized

Tanchjim Tanya Review

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Tanchjim is a brand known for the fantastic Tanchjim Oxygen IEM. Sitting at $279, the Oxygen is the defacto recommendation for anyone looking for a superb Harman-style tuning. Now the…

Tanchjim is a brand known for the fantastic Tanchjim Oxygen IEM. Sitting at $279, the Oxygen is the defacto recommendation for anyone looking for a superb Harman-style tuning. Now the company has released its first budget IEM, the Tanya. Does this one live up to the Oxygen’s legendary statuses? Let’s find out!

Pre-Breakdown Thoughts

My first experience with Tanya was a very present one. I found the entire signature to be very pleasing and memorable. It has an overall smooth and warm signature, delivering great bass power and a tamed upper midrange and treble. This tuning works well for anyone looking to relax and wind down at the end of the day. Personally, I’ve fallen asleep listening to the Tanya on multiple occasions. This tuning style is relatively safe as well because it avoids any fatiguing elements in the treble region.
Overall, I enjoy Tanya quite a bit. With that being said, let’s finally get down to the breakdown!

Bass

Bass on the Tanya is the focus point. It’s strong and hits with good authority. The bass does bleed into the midrange slightly, showing a slight lack of control. However, for $20, this is hardly a big issue. Sub-bass is present but not the main focus of this IEM. On tracks with a lot of Sub-bass, these will deliver those sounds, but don’t expect a lot of rumbles.
Overall, the bass is very pleasing, and it helps add to the warm signature of the IEM very well.

Midrange

The midrange has a warm tone with a significant lack in the upper midrange. As a result, the vocalists and instruments have a weighted feeling and lack sparkle. It can also be called “dark and warm” sounding. However, the signature is quite present, and it creates a relaxing delivery that’s easy to enjoy. One drawback is the lack of clarity due to the lack of upper midrange.

Treble

This IEM is on the darker side in terms of treble, especially in the lower treble area. Female vocals and specific instruments will not sound as bright as they should and not as natural as a result. Percussion hits can feel less sharp as well. The positive here is there are no fatiguing elements at all. Treble on Tanya is overall smooth, tamed, and relax. It comes at the cost of overall detail and crispiness, but it doesn’t make the IEM less enjoyable. It’s simply a different experience.

Technical Performance

When it comes to the technicals, Tanya falls short in micro details. Macro details are handled competently for the money. Imaging is surprisingly good for this price. You can pick out where instruments are in relation to each other. Soundstage lacked dept, so it does feel more 2D than 3D, but at this price, nothing to complain about at all.

Verdict

Although this set has some shortcomings, I still truly enjoy it for what it is. Every time I listen to it, I can’t help but just enjoy and appreciate it. I also like that it’s pretty versatile as well, working nicely with most genres. The only genres I would not recommend this for are metal, EDM, or busier tracks that require more details and treble performance. Other than those, I highly recommend the Tanya if you’re looking for an overall soothing, warm, and laid-back experience at a low cost.

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